History

In September 1931, American chemist Wallace Carothers reported a research carried out in the laboratories of the DuPont Company on “giant” molecules called polymers. He focused his work on a fiber referred to simply as “66,” a number derived from its molecular structure.
By 1938, Paul Schlack of the I.G. Farben Company in Germany, polymerized caprolactam and created a different form of the polymer, identified simply as nylon “6.”
DuPont began commercial production of nylon in 1939.
The first experimental testing used nylon as sewing thread, in parachute fabric, and in women's hosiery.

Properties       

Specific weight
Nylon 6         1.13 - 1.15
Nylon 6.6      1.13 - 1.15

Water absorbtion
Nylon 6        max. 8,5 - 10 %
Nylon 6.6     max. 8,5 %

Moisture regain 7 %

Elongation 50 %

Melting point
Nylon 6        210 - 220°C
Nylon 6.6     255-265°C

Decomposed by concentrated mineral acids, halogens

Combustion melts, darkens, finally burns with a small flame, easy to extinguish, giving a white smoke

Elastic modulus
Nylon 6       200 to 300
Nylon 6.6    250

Available both in hexagonal or standard diamond mesh.

The polyamide net can be manufactured adopting a weaving technology called "Superknot" granting, under the same title, a higher breaking strength, although, in such a case there is an increase of the weight.


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